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What's the treatment plan for dissociative identity disorder?

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While there's no "cure" for dissociative identity disorder, long-term treatment can be helpful, if the patient stays committed. Effective treatment includes:

There are no established medication treatments for dissociative identity disorder, making psychologically-based approaches the mainstay of therapy. Treatment of co-occurring disorders, such as depression or substance use disorders, is fundamental to overall improvement. Because the symptoms of dissociative disorders often occur with other disorders, such as anxiety and depression, medicines to treat those co-occurring problems, if present, are sometimes used in addition to psychotherapy.

  • Psychotherapy: Also called talk therapy, the therapy is designed to work through whatever triggered and triggers the DID. The goal is to help “fuse” the separate personality traits into one consolidated personality that can control the triggers. This therapy often includes involving family members in the therapy.
  • Hypnotherapy . Used in conjunction with psychotherapy, clinical hypnosis can be used to help access repressed memories, control some of the problematic behaviors which accompany DID as well as help integrate the personalities into one.
  • Adjunctive therapy. Therapies such as art or movement therapy have been shown to help people connect with parts of their mind that they have shut off to cope with trauma.

SOURCES:

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Dissociative Identity Disorder."

Mayo Clinic: "Dissociative disorders."

 

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 22, 2019

SOURCES:

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Dissociative Identity Disorder."

Mayo Clinic: "Dissociative disorders."

 

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 22, 2019

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