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Who gets persistent depressive disorder?

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Up to 4% of the general population is affected by PDD. Its cause isn't well understood. It's probably a combination of things, including:

These factors can also feed off each other, reinforcing symptoms or adding stress.

  • Genetics
  • Differences in how brain circuits involved with emotional processing work
  • Chronic stress or medical illness
  • Isolation
  • Poor ways of dealing with problems and adjusting to life stresses

From: Mood Disorders WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

MedlinePlus: "Dysthymia" and "Cyclothymia." 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Dysthymic Disorder: When Depression Lingers." 

EMedicine: "Dysthymic Disorder." 

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Depression."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Cyclothymia (Cyclothymic Disorder)." 

World Health Organization: "What Is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Persistent Depressive Disorder."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD)."

BASC 3: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on February 21, 2018

SOURCES: 

MedlinePlus: "Dysthymia" and "Cyclothymia." 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Dysthymic Disorder: When Depression Lingers." 

EMedicine: "Dysthymic Disorder." 

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Depression."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Cyclothymia (Cyclothymic Disorder)." 

World Health Organization: "What Is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Persistent Depressive Disorder."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD)."

BASC 3: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on February 21, 2018

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What are symptoms of persistent depressive disorder?

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