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Who gets posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

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Everyone reacts to traumatic events differently. Each person is unique in his or her ability to manage fear and stress and to cope with the threat posed by a traumatic event or situation. For that reason, not everyone who experiences or witnesses a trauma will develop PTSD. Further, the type of help and support a person receives from friends, family members and professionals following the trauma may influence the development of PTSD or the severity of symptoms.

PTSD was first brought to the attention of the medical community by war veterans; hence the names shell shock and battle fatigue syndrome. However, PTSD can occur in anyone who has experienced a traumatic event that threatens death or violence. People who have been abused as children or who have been repeatedly exposed to life-threatening situations are at greater risk for developing PTSD. Victims of trauma related to physical and sexual assault face the greatest risk for PTSD.

From: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE:

National Alliance on Mental Illness. 

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 25, 2018

SOURCE:

National Alliance on Mental Illness. 

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 25, 2018

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How common is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

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