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  • Answer 1/11

    Hypnosis is:

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    When you’re guided into hypnosis, you move from being alert and aware of what’s around you to a calm, relaxed, trance-like state. You’re not asleep -- it’s more like you’re daydreaming. You’re more open to suggestion, but you’re still in control of your own actions.

  • Question 1/11

    The word hypnosis means:

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    The word hypnosis means:

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    Hypnosis comes from the Greek words hypnos  meaning “sleep” and -osis  meaning “condition.”

  • Question 1/11

    The American Medical Association (AMA) first endorsed hypnosis as a clinical practice in:

  • Answer 1/11

    The American Medical Association (AMA) first endorsed hypnosis as a clinical practice in:

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    The AMA approved a 2-year study by the Council on Mental Health. The group said medical and dental practices could benefit from the proper use of hypnosis. They also suggested building hypnosis training centers in the U.S.   

  • Question 1/11

    You can hypnotize yourself.

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    You can hypnotize yourself.

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    With practice and training, you can learn self-hypnosis techniques similar to meditation. It can help manage ongoing pain, improve sleep, and ease some symptoms of depression or anxiety.

  • Question 1/11

    One risk of hypnosis is:

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    One risk of hypnosis is:

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    Hypnosis may help you remember something you’ve forgotten, but it can also make you imagine something that didn’t actually happen.

  • Question 1/11

    Hypnosis can make someone tell the truth.

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    Hypnosis can make someone tell the truth.

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    Hypnosis won’t work as a lie detector test. You still have control over your actions when hypnotized, so it can’t make you say something you don’t want to say.

  • Question 1/11

    How much of the population can be hypnotized?

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    How much of the population can be hypnotized?

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    Studies show hypnosis works on only about 10% of the population. Researchers aren’t  sure why, but for many people, it’s harder to get the brain into the trance-like state you need for hypnosis to take hold. Some research suggests people who can get there have higher activity in certain parts of the brain.

  • Question 1/11

    For some people, hypnosis can help:

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    For some people, hypnosis can help:

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    If you’re someone who can easily enter into a hypnotized state, it may help with several conditions. These include chronic pain, chemotherapy side effects, smoking addiction, hot flashes, PTSD symptoms, phobias, and anxiety.

  • Question 1/11

    A previous name for hypnosis was

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    A previous name for hypnosis was

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    Franz Mesmer was an Austrian doctor who lived in the 1700s. His techniques helped form some of the first hypnosis practices.

  • Question 1/11

    You won’t remember what happens during a hypnosis session.

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    You won’t remember what happens during a hypnosis session.

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    Hypnosis should make you feel calm, secure, and relaxed. You’re aware of what’s happening. You should also remember what you did and how you felt when it’s over.

  • Question 1/11

    Your eyes have to be closed in order for hypnosis to work.

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    Your eyes have to be closed in order for hypnosis to work.

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    There are different techniques for hypnotizing someone. The traditional method involves closing your eyes, but there are more active methods, including exercises like riding a stationary bike. 

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

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    You could mesmerize a crowd with your hypnosis knowledge!

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    You must be getting very ... sleepy ... you missed a few!

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    Some of those questions had you entranced. Read up on hypnosis and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella, MD on January 29, 2020 Medically Reviewed on January 29, 2020

Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella, MD on
January 29, 2020

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Journal of Health and Research Reviews: “Hypnotherapy in cancer care: Clinical benefits and prospective implications.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Complementary and alternative medicine treatments (CAM) for cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: “Hypnosis in Contemporary Medicine.”

International Journal Of Clinical & Experimental Hypnosis: “Hypnosis: There’s an App for that. A systematic review of hypnosis apps.”

American Psychological Association: “Hypnosis today.”

Pennsylvania State University: “Probing Question: Does hypnosis work?”

Stanford Medicine: “Study identifies brain areas altered during hypnotic trances.”

PLOS One: “Structural and Functional Cerebral Correlates of Hypnotic Suggestibility.”

The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis: “A Review of the History of Hypnosis Through the Late 19th Century.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hypnosis.”

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