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Do blood vessels play a role in the connection between migraines and strokes?

ANSWER

One theory about the connection has to do with damage to the cells that line the blood vessels. Some research has found that a migraine can cause inflammation inside your arteries, which can make them stiff and cause your blood to clot more easily. Both of those increase your chances of a stroke.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Stroke Information Page," "Transient Ischemic Attack Information Page," "Migraine Information Page."

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

National Headache Foundation: "Transient Ischemic Attacks (TIA)," "Migraine," "Aura."

The Migraine Trust: "Stroke and Migraine."

American Migraine Foundation: "Migraine, Stroke and Heart Disease."

Migraine Research Foundation: "Migraine Facts."

National Stroke Association: "Do I Have A Migraine, Or Is This A Stroke?"

Kurth, T. November, 2012. Stroke,

Reviewed by Lawrence C. Newman on July 17, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Stroke Information Page," "Transient Ischemic Attack Information Page," "Migraine Information Page."

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

National Headache Foundation: "Transient Ischemic Attacks (TIA)," "Migraine," "Aura."

The Migraine Trust: "Stroke and Migraine."

American Migraine Foundation: "Migraine, Stroke and Heart Disease."

Migraine Research Foundation: "Migraine Facts."

National Stroke Association: "Do I Have A Migraine, Or Is This A Stroke?"

Kurth, T. November, 2012. Stroke,

Reviewed by Lawrence C. Newman on July 17, 2017

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What are late-life migraine accompaniments?

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