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Does marijuana work for migraines?

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More research is necessary, but in a study at the University of Colorado, 121 people who got regular migraine headaches used marijuana daily to prevent attacks. About 40% of them said the number of migraine headaches they got each month was cut in half. The people used different types of marijuana, but they mostly inhaled it to ease a migraine in progress and found that it did help stop the pain.

In some states, it isn’t even legal to buy, grow, own, or use marijuana, even for medical reasons. Make sure you find out about your state’s laws before trying it.

   

SOURCES:

   

National Headache Foundation: “Migraine.”

   

Baron, EP. Headache. June 2015.

   

University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health: “Medical Marijuana for the Treatment of Migraine Headaches: An Evidence Review.”

   

National Conference of State Legislatures: “State Medical Marijuana Laws.”

   

Manzanares, J. Current Neuropharmacology. July 2006.

   

Benbadis, S. Expert Reviews of Neurotherapeutics. Published online Nov. 2014.

   

Project CBD.org: “What Is CBD?”

   

Rhyne, D. Pharmacotherapy. Jan. 2016.

   

Americans for Safe Access: “Guide to Using Medical Cannabis.”

   

Degenhardt, L and Hall, WD. Canadian Medical Association Journal. June 2008.

   

National Association of Attorneys General: “The Effects of Marijuana Legalization on Employment Law.”

   

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “The Biology and Potential Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol.”

   

State of Oregon: “Frequently Asked Questions About Marijuana in the Workplace.”

 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 19, 2019

   

SOURCES:

   

National Headache Foundation: “Migraine.”

   

Baron, EP. Headache. June 2015.

   

University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health: “Medical Marijuana for the Treatment of Migraine Headaches: An Evidence Review.”

   

National Conference of State Legislatures: “State Medical Marijuana Laws.”

   

Manzanares, J. Current Neuropharmacology. July 2006.

   

Benbadis, S. Expert Reviews of Neurotherapeutics. Published online Nov. 2014.

   

Project CBD.org: “What Is CBD?”

   

Rhyne, D. Pharmacotherapy. Jan. 2016.

   

Americans for Safe Access: “Guide to Using Medical Cannabis.”

   

Degenhardt, L and Hall, WD. Canadian Medical Association Journal. June 2008.

   

National Association of Attorneys General: “The Effects of Marijuana Legalization on Employment Law.”

   

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “The Biology and Potential Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol.”

   

State of Oregon: “Frequently Asked Questions About Marijuana in the Workplace.”

 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 19, 2019

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