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How are high-pressure headaches treated?

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The best way to ease the effects is to lose weight. That lowers the pressure on your brain and your optic nerve. Studies show that even weight loss of 5%-10% can ease symptoms.

During treatment, regular and complete vision testing should be done, too, to keep an eye on pressure on your optic nerve. In some cases, a medication called acetazolamide is used. In severe cases, you may need surgery to ease the pressure on your brain. Eye surgery is another possibility.

SOURCES:

The Migraine Trust: “Headache.”

Mayo Clinic: “Headache.”

American Migraine Foundation: “What to Know About Low-Pressure Headaches.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension.”

Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports: "Spontaneous intracranial hypotension."

Spinal CSF Leak Foundation.

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

American Migraine Foundation: “The Low Down on High-Pressure Headache.”

Neurosurgery : "Trigeminal Neuralgia in a Patient with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula in Meckel's Cave: Case Report."

Current Treatment Options in Neurology: " Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri): Recognition, Treatment, and Ongoing Management."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Lumbar Puncture."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 11, 2018

SOURCES:

The Migraine Trust: “Headache.”

Mayo Clinic: “Headache.”

American Migraine Foundation: “What to Know About Low-Pressure Headaches.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension.”

Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports: "Spontaneous intracranial hypotension."

Spinal CSF Leak Foundation.

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

American Migraine Foundation: “The Low Down on High-Pressure Headache.”

Neurosurgery : "Trigeminal Neuralgia in a Patient with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula in Meckel's Cave: Case Report."

Current Treatment Options in Neurology: " Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri): Recognition, Treatment, and Ongoing Management."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Lumbar Puncture."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 11, 2018

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