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How can I prevent my child from getting abdominal migraines?

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With their parents' and doctor's help, kids with abdominal migraines may be able to figure out what triggers them. Keep a diary: Note the date and time they get abdominal pain, what foods they had eaten earlier, what they were doing before it happened, if they took any medication recently, and if there's anything going on in their lives that could be making them stressed or anxious.

If a food triggers an abdominal migraine, they can try to avoid eating it. But that may not work for everyone.

From: Abdominal Migraines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FDA: "Managing migraines."

eMedicineHealth: "Migraine Variants."

The National Migraine Association: "What is abdominal migraine?"

Neurology Channel: "Migraine Headaches."

National Headache Foundation: "Abdominal Migraine."

MedicineNet.com: "Migraine Headaches."

International Headache Society ICHD-II: "Abdominal Migraine Diagnosis."

Scicchitano, B. , published online Aug. 7, 2014. Dovepress

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 12, 2018

SOURCES:

FDA: "Managing migraines."

eMedicineHealth: "Migraine Variants."

The National Migraine Association: "What is abdominal migraine?"

Neurology Channel: "Migraine Headaches."

National Headache Foundation: "Abdominal Migraine."

MedicineNet.com: "Migraine Headaches."

International Headache Society ICHD-II: "Abdominal Migraine Diagnosis."

Scicchitano, B. , published online Aug. 7, 2014. Dovepress

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 12, 2018

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What are abdominal migraines?

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