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How can you work with your feelings to help with tension headaches?

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When you feel stressed out, anxious, or angry, the way you handle those feelings may make a difference in whether you get a tension headache or not. Everyone has stress in their life. Try to cut back on how much you have. When you can’t avoid it, look for different ways to handle those stressful situations. Try to pace yourself in your daily life. Take breaks. Carve out time to do things you enjoy. For some people, mindfulness -- staying in the here and now, instead of following thoughts of worry and fear -- can help. Build your support system. Spend time with people you love. You may also want to book some sessions with a therapist to find solutions and to manage any anxiety or depression you may have.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Rebound Headaches.”

Harvard Health Publications: “4 ways to tame tension headaches.”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “Tension Headache.”

National Headaches Foundation: “Tension-Type Headache.”

President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.”

University of California Berkeley: “Headaches.”

University of Michigan: “When Should You See a Doctor for Headache or Migraines?”

University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: “Headaches: Should I Take Prescription Medicine for Tension Headaches?”

National Stroke Association: “Act FAST.”

UpToDate: "Tension-type headache in adults: Preventive treatment."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 07, 2017

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Rebound Headaches.”

Harvard Health Publications: “4 ways to tame tension headaches.”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “Tension Headache.”

National Headaches Foundation: “Tension-Type Headache.”

President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.”

University of California Berkeley: “Headaches.”

University of Michigan: “When Should You See a Doctor for Headache or Migraines?”

University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: “Headaches: Should I Take Prescription Medicine for Tension Headaches?”

National Stroke Association: “Act FAST.”

UpToDate: "Tension-type headache in adults: Preventive treatment."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 07, 2017

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How common are headaches and migraines in older people?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.