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How do auras relate to migraines?

ANSWER

In about 20% to 25% of people with migraines, an aura precedes the headache or occurs alongside it. A typical aura has symptoms that may be:

These symptoms develop gradually, last no longer than one hour, and are completely reversible. Some people may have only one of these symptoms of an aura. Other people may experience one after another during a migraine attack.

  • Visual changes such as flickering lights, spots or lines, loss of vision.
  • Sensory changes, such as numbness, tingling, or pins-and-needles feeling in the body.
  • Speech problems, including difficulty speaking or understanding words.

SOURCES:

International Headache Society: "Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM)."

Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary , 30th edition.

Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice , 6th edition.

Kirchmann, M. March 2006. Neurology,

American Headache Society: "Photosensitivity and the Headache Patient."

Sun-Edelstein, C. June 2009. Clinical Journal of Pain,

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Glossary."

UpToDate.

Reviewed by Stephen D. Silberstein on July 17, 2017

SOURCES:

International Headache Society: "Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM)."

Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary , 30th edition.

Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice , 6th edition.

Kirchmann, M. March 2006. Neurology,

American Headache Society: "Photosensitivity and the Headache Patient."

Sun-Edelstein, C. June 2009. Clinical Journal of Pain,

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Glossary."

UpToDate.

Reviewed by Stephen D. Silberstein on July 17, 2017

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What is familial hemiplegic migraine?

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