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How do I know if my sleep schedule is triggering migraines?

ANSWER

If an altered sleep schedule or sleep problems are behind your migraines, you might notice that you always get headaches at the same time every day, most often in the morning.

Your migraine may also wake you up, or you may feel it coming on shortly after you get out of bed. More than half of migraines happen between 4 and 9 a.m., and this may be because they're linked to sleep.

Even if you don't notice this pattern, your migraines could still be linked to a sleep disorder, lack of sleep, or changes in your sleep schedule.

SOURCES:

Headache : "Headache and Sleep: Examination of Sleep Patterns and Complaints in a Large Clinical Sample of Migraineurs."

The Migraine Trust: "Sleep and migraine."

American Migraine Foundation: "Sleep Disorders and Headache."

National Sleep Foundation: "Sleep Diary."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 2, 2019

SOURCES:

Headache : "Headache and Sleep: Examination of Sleep Patterns and Complaints in a Large Clinical Sample of Migraineurs."

The Migraine Trust: "Sleep and migraine."

American Migraine Foundation: "Sleep Disorders and Headache."

National Sleep Foundation: "Sleep Diary."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 2, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How can a migraine diary help with sleeping problems?

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