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How is a silent migraine diagnosed?

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Headache experts may not agree on everything, but they do agree that keeping a daily diary is a critical step. Try to track everything you eat and drink, changes in your sleep or stress levels, and other possible triggers. Also, keep track of your symptoms and the times they begin and end. Your diary and your medical history will help your doctor figure out what's going on.

In rare cases, your symptoms could be a sign of a different, more-serious medical problem, such as a stroke or bleeding in the brain. To rule these out, your doctor may want to do more tests, such as a CT scan or MRI, or have you see a specialist called a neurologist for an exam.

From: Silent Migraines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Headache Foundation: "Headache - Frequently Asked Questions."

National Library of Medicine: "Migraine with Aura."

Migraine Research Foundation: "About Migraine."

eMedicine.com: "Pathophysiology and Treatment of Migraine and Related Headache."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "21st Century Prevention and Management of Migraine Headaches."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 12, 2017

SOURCES:

National Headache Foundation: "Headache - Frequently Asked Questions."

National Library of Medicine: "Migraine with Aura."

Migraine Research Foundation: "About Migraine."

eMedicine.com: "Pathophysiology and Treatment of Migraine and Related Headache."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "21st Century Prevention and Management of Migraine Headaches."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 12, 2017

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