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How is caffeine related to a rebound headache?

ANSWER

Caffeine is also a factor in what’s known as a medication overuse, or rebound headache. This can happen when you take too much of any kind of pain reliever or take it too often. When the medicine wears off, the pain comes back worse than before. When you combine caffeine with pain relievers this condition is more likely. This type of headache is rare and can be avoided by following instructions on the medication's label.

SOURCES:

American Migraine Foundation

Migliardi, J. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, November 1994.

Lipton, R. Archives of Neurology, February 1998.

National Headache Foundation: “Caffeine: A Little Bit Goes a Long Way.”

Ward, N. Pain, February 1991.

American Headache Society: “Caffeine and Migraine.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Headache: Hope Through Research.”

Diamond, S. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 2001.

Diener, H. Current Treatment Options in Neurology, 2011.

Silverman, K. New England Journal of Medicine, October 1992.

Addicott, M. Human Brain Mapping, October 2009.

Cleveland Clinic: “Rebound Headaches.”

Cupini, L. Journal of Headache and Pain, 2005.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Behavioral Biology Research Center: "Caffeine Dependence."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Headache treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics),” “Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of migraine in adults.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2019

SOURCES:

American Migraine Foundation

Migliardi, J. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, November 1994.

Lipton, R. Archives of Neurology, February 1998.

National Headache Foundation: “Caffeine: A Little Bit Goes a Long Way.”

Ward, N. Pain, February 1991.

American Headache Society: “Caffeine and Migraine.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Headache: Hope Through Research.”

Diamond, S. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 2001.

Diener, H. Current Treatment Options in Neurology, 2011.

Silverman, K. New England Journal of Medicine, October 1992.

Addicott, M. Human Brain Mapping, October 2009.

Cleveland Clinic: “Rebound Headaches.”

Cupini, L. Journal of Headache and Pain, 2005.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Behavioral Biology Research Center: "Caffeine Dependence."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Headache treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics),” “Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of migraine in adults.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2019

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What can I do to manage my caffeine and my headaches?

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