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Is it common to get a headache if you have a stroke?

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Headaches commonly accompany stroke. In a study of 163 patients who’d had a stroke, 60% reported a headache with the stroke, especially women and those with a history of headaches. Up to 46% reported having an incapacitating headache; most said the headache was mild to moderately painful. The headaches are equally likely to come on quickly or slowly.

From: Geriatric Headaches and Migraines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Silent Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Disease."

Serratrice , G. March 1985. Headache,

Vongvaivanich K., Cephalalgia, . September 2015

Fisher, CM March 1980.   , Canadian journal of neurological sciences,

WebMD: "Temporal Arteritis" sand "How to Treat Nerve Pain After Shingles."

UpToDate: "Clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis" and "Hypnic headache."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Trigeminal Neuralgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 12, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Silent Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Disease."

Serratrice , G. March 1985. Headache,

Vongvaivanich K., Cephalalgia, . September 2015

Fisher, CM March 1980.   , Canadian journal of neurological sciences,

WebMD: "Temporal Arteritis" sand "How to Treat Nerve Pain After Shingles."

UpToDate: "Clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis" and "Hypnic headache."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Trigeminal Neuralgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 12, 2018

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What's the connection between heaches and temporal (giant cell) arteritis?

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