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What are some treatments that could prevent migraines?

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CGRPs (calcitonin gene-related peptides) are chemicals in your nervous system that trigger inflammation and cause your blood vessels to widen. They spike during migraine attacks. Medications called CGRP inhibitors have been found to lower the number of migraines without the side effects of other treatments. The FDA has approved erenumab (Aimovig) and fremanezumab (Ajovy) for use in migraine treatment.

There are also several devices which can prevent migraines:

  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): During this treatment, you'll hold a small device called SpringTMS to the back of your head. It sends a split-second pulse which interrupts abnormal electrical activity caused by migraine, thus aborts the migraine.
  • Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation  (TSNS) : Cefaly uses transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation and is worn as a headband on the forehead and turned on daily for 20 minutes to prevent migraine from developing. 
  • Noninvasive vagus nerve stimulator (nVS):  gammaCore is a nVS and works by being placed placed over the vagus nerve in the neck. It releases a mild electrical stimulation to the nerve's fibers to relieve pain. 

NeuroSciences : “New advances in prevention of migraine: Review of current practice and recent advances.”

Functional Neurology : “Migraine as a complex disease: heterogeneity, comorbidity and genotype-phenotype interactions.”

National Headache Foundation: “Facts about Triptans,” “Migraine.”

Expert Reviews of Clinical Pharmacology : “The Pathophysiological and Pharmacological Basis of Current Drug Treatment of Migraine Headache.”

Mayo Clinic: “Migraine: Treatment.”

The Lancet Neurology : “Effects of tonabersat on migraine with aura: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study,” “Headache research in 2015: progress in migraine treatment.”

Neurology : “TEV-48125 for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine.”

Hormone Health Network/Endocrine Society: “What Do Prostaglandins Do?”

Current Opinion in Neurology : “Prostaglandins in migraine: update.”

The DANA Foundation: “Theory Behind Migraine Emerges.”

The Migraine Trust: “Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).”

American Migraine Foundation: “Behavioral Treatment of Headache and Migraine Patients -- Making Referrals,” “Biofeedback and Relaxation Training for Headaches.”

Medscape: “Phase 3 STRIVE and ARISE Trials Show Efficacy, Safety for Erenumab in Migraine Prevention,” “Positive Phase 3 Results for Fremanezumab in Migraine.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

NeuroSciences : “New advances in prevention of migraine: Review of current practice and recent advances.”

Functional Neurology : “Migraine as a complex disease: heterogeneity, comorbidity and genotype-phenotype interactions.”

National Headache Foundation: “Facts about Triptans,” “Migraine.”

Expert Reviews of Clinical Pharmacology : “The Pathophysiological and Pharmacological Basis of Current Drug Treatment of Migraine Headache.”

Mayo Clinic: “Migraine: Treatment.”

The Lancet Neurology : “Effects of tonabersat on migraine with aura: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study,” “Headache research in 2015: progress in migraine treatment.”

Neurology : “TEV-48125 for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine.”

Hormone Health Network/Endocrine Society: “What Do Prostaglandins Do?”

Current Opinion in Neurology : “Prostaglandins in migraine: update.”

The DANA Foundation: “Theory Behind Migraine Emerges.”

The Migraine Trust: “Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).”

American Migraine Foundation: “Behavioral Treatment of Headache and Migraine Patients -- Making Referrals,” “Biofeedback and Relaxation Training for Headaches.”

Medscape: “Phase 3 STRIVE and ARISE Trials Show Efficacy, Safety for Erenumab in Migraine Prevention,” “Positive Phase 3 Results for Fremanezumab in Migraine.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

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How can EP4 receptor antagonists help prevent migraines?

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