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What are some triggers of migraines?

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Sometimes migraines come out of nowhere. Other times they’re tied to a specific trigger. You likely have an idea of what sorts of things cause your headaches. It may be certain foods or the weather. It could be smells, travel, or your hormones. Medicine can help prevent some headaches, but it doesn't always work. Because you can't always ward off all your migraines, plan around what starts them. Skipping meals can trigger migraines, so eat regularly. Don't plan a day where you won't have time to eat. Too much or not enough sleep can also bring on a headache. Be sure to get the right amount. Knowing your migraine triggers can help you plan the activities in your life a little better. That way you can still do things with family and friends before a migraine starts.

From: When Migraines Interfere With Your Life WebMD Medical Reference

National Migraine Centre: "Migraine: How to live with it."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Migraines."

Mayo Clinic: "Migraine: Self-management," "Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain."

American Migraine Foundation: "What to do When a Migraine Comes Out of Nowhere and You Are at Work."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: "Impact of Migraine on the Family: Perspectives of People With Migraine and Their Spouse/Domestic Partner in the CaMEO Study."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

National Migraine Centre: "Migraine: How to live with it."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Migraines."

Mayo Clinic: "Migraine: Self-management," "Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain."

American Migraine Foundation: "What to do When a Migraine Comes Out of Nowhere and You Are at Work."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: "Impact of Migraine on the Family: Perspectives of People With Migraine and Their Spouse/Domestic Partner in the CaMEO Study."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

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What should someone do if a migraine hits them at work?

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