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What drugs are used to treat vestibular migraines?

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If you have frequent or disabling vestibular migraines, your doctor may try drugs similar to traditional migraine meds. They include:

  • Antiseizure drugs like gabapentin and topiramate
  • Blood pressure medicines like beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers
  • Tricyclic antidepressants
  • CGRP inhibitors are a new class of preventive medicine that your doctor may recommend if other medicines don’t help.

From: Vestibular Migraines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

UpToDate: “Vestibular migraine.”

Merriam-Webster Dictionary: "Vestibular."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a. Migraine Associated Vertigo or MAV)."

UpToDate: “Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of migraine in adults.”

Stolte, B. , published online, May 20, 2014. Cephalalgia

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Migraine Associated Vertigo (MAV)."

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Meniere’s Disease."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 27, 2018

SOURCES:

UpToDate: “Vestibular migraine.”

Merriam-Webster Dictionary: "Vestibular."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a. Migraine Associated Vertigo or MAV)."

UpToDate: “Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of migraine in adults.”

Stolte, B. , published online, May 20, 2014. Cephalalgia

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Migraine Associated Vertigo (MAV)."

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Meniere’s Disease."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 27, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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