PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is the link between migraines and hormones?

ANSWER

A drop in the female hormone, estrogen, can also set off migraines. That's why women who get migraines often have headaches right before their period, when estrogen levels are low. During pregnancy, estrogen levels rise, bringing many women a break from these headaches. But they often start up again after the baby is born. As you get closer to menopause, your hormone levels can swing up and down, and your periods may get more irregular. If your migraines are tied to your menstrual cycle, they may become as unpredictable as your periods. Some women get migraines for the first time, or their headaches get more intense, in the years just before menopause. Others find that their migraines become less frequent and less intense. Women who had their uterus and ovaries removed with surgery often have more of a problem with migraines than those who go into menopause naturally.

From: Migraines and Menopause WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Migraine Foundation: "About Migraine."

Cleveland Clinic: "Hormone Headaches/Menstrual Migraines."

MedlinePlus: “Acetaminophen,” "Valporic Acid.”

MacGregor, E. , January 2009. Current Treatment Options in Neurology

Nappi, R. , June 2009. Menopause International

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Migraine Information Page."

The North American Menopause Society: "My-Oh-Migraine: Hormonal Headaches and Menopause."

The Migraine Trust: "Menopause, Midlife and Migraine."

University of California, Berkeley Health Services: "Migraine Triggers."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 22, 2018

SOURCES:

American Migraine Foundation: "About Migraine."

Cleveland Clinic: "Hormone Headaches/Menstrual Migraines."

MedlinePlus: “Acetaminophen,” "Valporic Acid.”

MacGregor, E. , January 2009. Current Treatment Options in Neurology

Nappi, R. , June 2009. Menopause International

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Migraine Information Page."

The North American Menopause Society: "My-Oh-Migraine: Hormonal Headaches and Menopause."

The Migraine Trust: "Menopause, Midlife and Migraine."

University of California, Berkeley Health Services: "Migraine Triggers."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 22, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What medicines can help with menopausal migraines?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.