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How do cluster headaches happen?

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You get a cluster headache when a specific path of nerves in the base of your brain is activated. That signal seems to come from a deeper part of the brain called the hypothalamus, where the "internal biological clock" that controls your sleep and wake cycles lives.

The nerve that causes the pain, called the trigeminal nerve, is responsible for sensations such as heat or pain in your face. It's near your eye, and it branches up to your forehead, across your cheek, down your jaw line, and above your ear on the same side, too.

A brain condition such as a tumor or an aneurysm won't cause these headaches.

SOURCE: 

Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 09, 2018

SOURCE: 

Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 09, 2018

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How long does it take for cluster headaches to reach their full force?

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