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What should someone do if a migraine hits them at work?

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There's a chance a headache will hit while you're on the job. Do some prep work so you know what to do and the people around you know what to expect. For example:

  • Talk to your boss or HR department. Let them know about your migraines and that you might need to come in late or leave early if you have one.
  • Be prepared. Keep medicine with you and take it as soon as you feel a migraine coming on. Have a heat pack or cold pack on hand if you can. Find a dark, quiet place you can go.

From: When Migraines Interfere With Your Life WebMD Medical Reference

National Migraine Centre: "Migraine: How to live with it."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Migraines."

Mayo Clinic: "Migraine: Self-management," "Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain."

American Migraine Foundation: "What to do When a Migraine Comes Out of Nowhere and You Are at Work."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: "Impact of Migraine on the Family: Perspectives of People With Migraine and Their Spouse/Domestic Partner in the CaMEO Study."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

National Migraine Centre: "Migraine: How to live with it."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Migraines."

Mayo Clinic: "Migraine: Self-management," "Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain."

American Migraine Foundation: "What to do When a Migraine Comes Out of Nowhere and You Are at Work."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: "Impact of Migraine on the Family: Perspectives of People With Migraine and Their Spouse/Domestic Partner in the CaMEO Study."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 18, 2019

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How do migraines affect family?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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