PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What's the connection between heaches and temporal (giant cell) arteritis?

ANSWER

Headaches are the most common symptom of temporal (giant cell) arteritis, or TA, a disease that causes your arteries to swell and narrow.

TA is more common in people older than age 50. The headache pain is described most often as throbbing, and may be intermittent or constant. The headache can be on one or both sides of the head, typically near the temples. But it can be over the forehead or even the back of the head. About half of the people with TA also get bad pain in the jaw with chewing.

From: Geriatric Headaches and Migraines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Silent Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Disease."

Serratrice , G. March 1985. Headache,

Vongvaivanich K., Cephalalgia, . September 2015

Fisher, CM March 1980.   , Canadian journal of neurological sciences,

WebMD: "Temporal Arteritis" sand "How to Treat Nerve Pain After Shingles."

UpToDate: "Clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis" and "Hypnic headache."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Trigeminal Neuralgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 12, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Silent Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Disease."

Serratrice , G. March 1985. Headache,

Vongvaivanich K., Cephalalgia, . September 2015

Fisher, CM March 1980.   , Canadian journal of neurological sciences,

WebMD: "Temporal Arteritis" sand "How to Treat Nerve Pain After Shingles."

UpToDate: "Clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis" and "Hypnic headache."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Trigeminal Neuralgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 12, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How is trigeminal neuralgia related to geriatric headaches and migraines?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.