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How are medications given to children to treat multiple sclerosis?

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Your child will get these meds by injection -- either into the muscle or beneath the skin. The doctor or nurse can work with you on how to make them easier for your child. Teenagers may be able to give themselves the shots.

Scientists haven’t done as much research on how these drugs affect children as they have for adults, but the results of small studies have shown that they work well and are safe for kids.

SOURCES:

The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center: Neuroscience News: “Multiple Sclerosis in Children Is More Common Than Thought.”

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Pediatric (Child) MS.”

The Transverse Myelitis Association: “Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM).”

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Multiple Sclerosis.”

Children’s Hospital Boston: “Multiple Sclerosis (MS).”

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on November 14, 2019

SOURCES:

The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center: Neuroscience News: “Multiple Sclerosis in Children Is More Common Than Thought.”

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Pediatric (Child) MS.”

The Transverse Myelitis Association: “Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM).”

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Multiple Sclerosis.”

Children’s Hospital Boston: “Multiple Sclerosis (MS).”

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on November 14, 2019

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Can doctors treat specific symptoms of multiple sclerosis in children?

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