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How can assistive technology help someone with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS)?

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Think about using assistive technology -- devices that can help keep you mobile and active. You may have to equip your car with special tools so you can still drive. You may need to put grab bars in your bathroom to make it easier to shower and use the toilet.

Someday, you may even need to remodel your home, or move, to avoid stairs or tight spaces that make using a wheelchair difficult.

Ultimately, these changes are about keeping your quality of life. This doesn't mean you're giving in to your condition. Instead, you're taking charge.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

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Why would someone with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) need to see a counselor?

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