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What happens to the eye when you have optic neuritis, and how does it affect vision?

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When you have optic neuritis, the nerve that sends messages from your eye to your brain, called the optic nerve, is inflamed. Sometimes, it means the nerve loses the fatty coating that covers and protects it, called myelin. Without it, the optic nerve can't send the right signals to your brain. This can lead to sudden changes in your vision.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "What Is Optic Neuritis?"

America Optometric Association: "How Your Eyes Work."

Cleveland Clinic: "Optic Neuritis."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: "Optic Neuritis and MS."

Nancy Holland, EdD, RN.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Diagnosis and Management of Vision Problems in MS," "Vision Problems: The Basic Facts."

Noseworthy, J. Neurology, 2001.

UptoDate: "Optic neuritis: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis," "Optic neuritis: Prognosis and treatment."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on April 21, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "What Is Optic Neuritis?"

America Optometric Association: "How Your Eyes Work."

Cleveland Clinic: "Optic Neuritis."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: "Optic Neuritis and MS."

Nancy Holland, EdD, RN.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Diagnosis and Management of Vision Problems in MS," "Vision Problems: The Basic Facts."

Noseworthy, J. Neurology, 2001.

UptoDate: "Optic neuritis: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis," "Optic neuritis: Prognosis and treatment."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on April 21, 2019

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Is optic neuritis a symptom of multiple sclerosis?

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