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How is dysesthesia (multiple sclerosis pain) treated?

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Doctors usually prescribe one of two kinds of drugs that work on your central nervous system:

A pain-relief cream that has lidocaine or capsaicin may soothe tingling and burning. In very rare cases, the narcotic pain medicine tramadol may be used for a short while if you have severe, burning pain.

  • Antidepressants like amitriptyline (Elavil) and duloxetine (Cymbalta) can change how your body responds to pain.
  • Anticonvulsants like gabapentin (Neurontin) or pregabalin (Lyrica) work to calm overstimulated nerves.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America: "Pain with MS."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research."

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: "Altered sensations."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 15, 2019

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America: "Pain with MS."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research."

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: "Altered sensations."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 15, 2019

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What are some pain management strategies for dysesthesia (multiple sclerosis pain)?

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