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How long do people with MS tend to live?

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MS may be a lifelong condition, but it's not a deadly one. And people with MS tend to live a long time. One large study found that on average, folks with MS lived to age 76, seven years shorter than people without it.

That gap may continue to shrink over time. While serious complications of advanced MS can be life-threatening, we now know that you can prevent many of them with good treatment and a healthy lifestyle.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Study Shows Life Expectancy for People with MS Increasing Over Time, But Still Lower Than the General Population," "Multiple Sclerosis FAQs," "Disease-Modifying Therapies for MS," "9 Myths," "Who Gets MS? (Epidemiology)," "Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues," "Genetics: The Basic Facts," "Exercise," "Talking with Your MS Patients about Difficult Topics," "Employment," "Career Options."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation's MS Focus: "Common Questions."

Mayo Clinic: "Exercise and Multiple Sclerosis."

Cleveland Clinic: "Exercise & Multiple Sclerosis."

MS International Federation: "Employment and MS."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 20, 2018

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Study Shows Life Expectancy for People with MS Increasing Over Time, But Still Lower Than the General Population," "Multiple Sclerosis FAQs," "Disease-Modifying Therapies for MS," "9 Myths," "Who Gets MS? (Epidemiology)," "Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues," "Genetics: The Basic Facts," "Exercise," "Talking with Your MS Patients about Difficult Topics," "Employment," "Career Options."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation's MS Focus: "Common Questions."

Mayo Clinic: "Exercise and Multiple Sclerosis."

Cleveland Clinic: "Exercise & Multiple Sclerosis."

MS International Federation: "Employment and MS."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 20, 2018

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