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Should I talk to my children about multiple sclerosis?

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Once you learn you have multiple sclerosis, it may take time to adjust to your symptoms and to know what to expect from your disease. The same goes for your children. They might also feel scared, sad, angry, or helpless about your diagnosis. The most important thing is to talk to your children about how MS affects you and see what they’re thinking. Open communication can help you ease their fears, answer their questions, and let them know how you feel.

SOURCE: 

National MS Society.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 19, 2019

SOURCE: 

National MS Society.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on May 19, 2019

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How should I start the conversation about multiple sclerosis with my children?

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