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Should I talk to my doctor before I get pregnant if I have multiple sclerosis?

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Yes. Let her know you want to have a baby. If your MS is under control, you’ll probably get a green light.

Some MS drugs, like glatiramer acetate (Copaxone), teriflunomide (Aubagio), and interferons, aren’t safe during pregnancy. You’ll need to stop taking them at least 1 month before you start trying.

From: Have a Healthy Pregnancy With MS WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society:  “Pregnancy and MS: Kara’s Story,” “Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues,” “Pregnancy, Delivery, and the Postpartum Period.”  

Cleveland Clinic: “Multiple Sclerosis: Pregnancy Q and A.”

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: “Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis,” “Pregnancy For Women With Multiple Sclerosis.”

Medscape.com: “Expert Tips for Managing Pregnancy in MS.” 

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Multiple Sclerosis and Pregnancy,” “Urinary Tract Infections.”

The Journal of the American Medical Association. “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on November 10, 2018

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society:  “Pregnancy and MS: Kara’s Story,” “Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues,” “Pregnancy, Delivery, and the Postpartum Period.”  

Cleveland Clinic: “Multiple Sclerosis: Pregnancy Q and A.”

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: “Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis,” “Pregnancy For Women With Multiple Sclerosis.”

Medscape.com: “Expert Tips for Managing Pregnancy in MS.” 

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Multiple Sclerosis and Pregnancy,” “Urinary Tract Infections.”

The Journal of the American Medical Association. “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on November 10, 2018

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Should I try and time my pregnancy right if I have multiple sclerosis?

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