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What are some of the most common symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS)?

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Most people with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) first have trouble walking, and after many years, both legs may become stiff and weak. Many also have mild problems with their memory or thinking clearly. You may get other symptoms, too, such as fatigue, muscle stiffness (spasticity), and numbness, pain, or a "pins and needles" feeling.

While you won't know exactly what's going to happen next and you won't be able to repair your nerves, you can ease your symptoms and lessen the impact of the disease.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

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What are some ways to prepare for the symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS)?

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