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What are some ways to prepare for the symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS)?

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A physical therapist can work with you to strengthen weak muscles or build some parts of your body to make up for other areas. Exercise and physical therapy can also help calm spasms and relax tight muscles. Daily exercise can really boost your energy levels as well. Your exercise plan may include stretching, small weights, exercise bands, and water aerobics.

Medication can also help with spasticity as well as pain, fatigue, bladder and bowel problems, dizziness or vertigo, and sexual problems.

You'll probably end up working with a team of specialists, depending on your symptoms. You might see a nurse, a physical therapist, or a speech and language pathologist to help you communicate when talking gets harder, and a massage therapist to ease stress and achy muscles.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Managing Progressive MS."

MS Society UK: "What is primary progressive MS?"

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Spasticity," "Medications," "Pain," "Sexual Problems," "Living with Advanced MS," "Fatigue," "Cognitive Changes," "Increasing Accessibility."

Holland, N. , Summer 2011. International Journal of MS Care

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 23, 2016

NEXT QUESTION:

What lifestyle changes can someone with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) look forward to?

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