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What can happen if you have relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS)?

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Most people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a type called relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). It usually starts in your 20s or 30s.

If you have RRMS, you may have attacks when your symptoms flare up. These are called relapses.

An attack is followed by a time of recovery when you have no few or no symptoms, called remission. It can last weeks, months, or longer. The disease doesn't worsen during these breaks.

From: Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis."

Up-To-Date: "Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in adults."

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America.

National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE): "Multiple sclerosis. Understanding NICE guidance -- information for people with multiple sclerosis, their families and carers, and the public."

Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Exercise."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "FDA Approves Plegridy (Pegylated Interferon Beta) For Relapsing MS."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 10, 2017

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis."

Up-To-Date: "Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in adults."

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America.

National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE): "Multiple sclerosis. Understanding NICE guidance -- information for people with multiple sclerosis, their families and carers, and the public."

Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Exercise."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "FDA Approves Plegridy (Pegylated Interferon Beta) For Relapsing MS."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 10, 2017

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