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What causes dysesthesia (multiple sclerosis pain)?

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Dysesthesia is what's called neuropathic or neurogenic pain. That means it comes from your nervous system. Although you feel the pain in your feet or skin, that isn't where the problem is. Multiple sclerosis (MS) breaks down the covering that protects your nerves. That interrupts the messages between your brain and the rest of your body. Your brain can't read the nerve signals correctly, so it tells you that you feel something you really don't. Whether you have pain doesn't seem to be related to what kind of MS you have, how serious it is, or how long you've had it. Sometimes dysesthesia is one of the first signs of MS.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America: "Pain with MS."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research."

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: "Altered sensations."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 15, 2019

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America: "Pain with MS."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research."

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: "Altered sensations."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 15, 2019

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How is dysesthesia (multiple sclerosis pain) treated?

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