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NEXT QUESTION:

 

Will clinically isolated syndrome turn to multiple sclerosis?

ANSWER

There’s no way to know for sure, but an MRI can give your doctor a better idea. If the scan shows brain lesions, your chances of getting multiple sclerosis in the next few years are higher. If the MRI shows no lesions, your risk is small.

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “What is MS? Related conditions: Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).” National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: MS symptoms.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “NINDS multiple sclerosis information page.” National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).”

Kuhle J et.al. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, February 2015.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Treating MS: Medications: Adherence.”

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: Possible MS.”

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: “Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).”

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on November 14, 2019

SOURCES:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “What is MS? Related conditions: Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).” National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: MS symptoms.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “NINDS multiple sclerosis information page.” National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).”

Kuhle J et.al. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, February 2015.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Treating MS: Medications: Adherence.”

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “Symptoms & diagnosis: Possible MS.”

Multiple Sclerosis Trust: “Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).”

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on November 14, 2019

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Do you need treatment for clinically isolated syndrome?

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