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Can stress lead to canker sores?

ANSWER

Stress likely raises your chances of getting canker sores. These are small spots with a white or grayish base that have red borders. They show up inside your mouth, sometimes in pairs or in greater numbers.

Experts aren't sure what causes them. It could be a problem with your immune system, your body's defense against germs. Or they might be due to bacteria or viruses. Stress likely raises your chances of getting them.

SOURCES:

Carol Gomez Summerhays, DDS, San Diego dentist.

David Cochran, past president, American Academy of Periodontology; professor and chairman, department of periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

American Dental Association: "Common Mouth Sores."

Hugo, F.   June 2006. Journal of Periodontology,

Rosania, A.   February 2009. Journal of Periodontology,

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons: "The Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)."

Elter, J.   April 2002. Journal of Periodontology,

Reviewed by Michael Friedman on October 7, 2019

SOURCES:

Carol Gomez Summerhays, DDS, San Diego dentist.

David Cochran, past president, American Academy of Periodontology; professor and chairman, department of periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

American Dental Association: "Common Mouth Sores."

Hugo, F.   June 2006. Journal of Periodontology,

Rosania, A.   February 2009. Journal of Periodontology,

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons: "The Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)."

Elter, J.   April 2002. Journal of Periodontology,

Reviewed by Michael Friedman on October 7, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What can you do to get relief from canker sores?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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