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What is sedation dentristy?

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Sedation dentistry uses medication to help people who are anxious and fearful about going to the dentist relax during dental procedures. It's sometimes referred to as "sleep dentistry," although that's not entirely accurate. You're usually awake. Sedation can be used for everything from invasive procedures to a simple tooth cleaning.

You may also need a local anesthetic -- numbing medication at the site where the dentist is working -- to relieve pain if the procedure causes any discomfort.

SOURCES:

Rai, K, Hegde, A, and Goel, K. 2007; vol 32: pp 1-4. Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry,

American Dental Association: "Policy Statement: The Use of Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentists."

Joel M. Weaver, DDS, PhD, dentist anesthesiologist; emeritus professor, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University; spokesman, American Dental Association.

American Dental Association: "Guidelines for the Use of Sedation and Anesthesia by Dentists."

Reviewed by Michael Friedman on January 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Rai, K, Hegde, A, and Goel, K. 2007; vol 32: pp 1-4. Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry,

American Dental Association: "Policy Statement: The Use of Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentists."

Joel M. Weaver, DDS, PhD, dentist anesthesiologist; emeritus professor, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University; spokesman, American Dental Association.

American Dental Association: "Guidelines for the Use of Sedation and Anesthesia by Dentists."

Reviewed by Michael Friedman on January 15, 2018

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What are the levels of sedation dentistry?

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