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When should I see a doctor about strep throat?

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For your little ones, call the doctor right away if:

You should also contact the doctor if:

  • An infant is 12 weeks or younger and has a temperature of 100.4 F or higher
  • A fever goes above 104 F in any child
  • A child younger than 2 has a fever lasting more than 24 hours
  • A child 2 or older has a fever for more than 72 hours
  • A sandpaper-like rash appears that quickly spreads from the face to the neck and the rest of the body 

From: What Are the Symptoms of Strep Throat? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 9, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 9/9/2018

SOURCES:

MedlinePlus.gov: “Sore Throat.”

KidsHealth.org (Nemours Children’s Health System): “Strep Throat.”

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control: “Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: Strep Throat.”

Centers for Disease Control and Infection: “Is It Strep Throat?”

“Antibiotics Aren’t Always the Answer,”  “Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection,” “Group B Strep Infection in Adults.”

American Family Physician : “Common Questions about Streptococcal Pharyngitis.”

Clinical Infectious Diseases : “Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis: 2012 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.”

American Academy of Pediatrics (healthychildren.org): “When to Call the Pediatrician: Fever.”

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: Strep throat,” “Diseases & Conditions: Mononucleosis.”

PubMedHealth (National Center for Biotechnology Information): “Strep Throat: Symptoms.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: “Tonsils and Adenoids.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Strep Throat: Symptoms.”

University of Michigan Health System: “Swollen Lymph Nodes.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 9, 2018

SOURCES:

MedlinePlus.gov: “Sore Throat.”

KidsHealth.org (Nemours Children’s Health System): “Strep Throat.”

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control: “Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: Strep Throat.”

Centers for Disease Control and Infection: “Is It Strep Throat?”

“Antibiotics Aren’t Always the Answer,”  “Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection,” “Group B Strep Infection in Adults.”

American Family Physician : “Common Questions about Streptococcal Pharyngitis.”

Clinical Infectious Diseases : “Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis: 2012 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.”

American Academy of Pediatrics (healthychildren.org): “When to Call the Pediatrician: Fever.”

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: Strep throat,” “Diseases & Conditions: Mononucleosis.”

PubMedHealth (National Center for Biotechnology Information): “Strep Throat: Symptoms.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: “Tonsils and Adenoids.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Strep Throat: Symptoms.”

University of Michigan Health System: “Swollen Lymph Nodes.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 9, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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