0 0
  • Question 1/14

    The number of bacteria in your mouth is closest to the population of which of the following?

  • Answer 1/14

    The number of bacteria in your mouth is closest to the population of which of the following?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A typical human mouth contains billions of bacteria. If you haven't brushed your teeth lately, you might well have more living there right now than there are people on Earth.

    Scientists have identified more than 700 different species of microbes -- ultra-tiny living things such as bacteria -- that are in people's mouths.

  • Question 1/14

    A dog's mouth is cleaner than a human's.

  • Answer 1/14

    A dog's mouth is cleaner than a human's.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There's no basis for this myth. The mouths of humans and dogs both have roughly the same number of bacteria. And there are more than 100 different germs in dog (and cat) saliva that can make you sick.

  • Question 1/14

    If you drop food on the floor, it doesn't get germs on it if you pick it up within 5 seconds.

  • Answer 1/14

    If you drop food on the floor, it doesn't get germs on it if you pick it up within 5 seconds.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While it's true that the longer food is on the floor, the more germs it will pick up, the "5-second rule" isn't real.

    Food starts to pick up germs from the moment it hits the floor. You're better off tossing it and eating something else.

  • Question 1/14

    Anyone who kisses someone with gum disease will always get it.

  • Answer 1/14

    Anyone who kisses someone with gum disease will always get it.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's not contagious. While bacteria can pass through saliva, gum disease typically develops if your teeth and gums aren't healthy.

    If your mouth isn't healthy, you increase your risk for gum disease through repeated and lengthy exposure to someone who's got it. To help keep germs away, brush, floss, and use an antiseptic mouthwash daily.

  • Question 1/14

    If you find yourself without a toothbrush, it's a good idea to borrow a friend's.

  • Answer 1/14

    If you find yourself without a toothbrush, it's a good idea to borrow a friend's.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You should never share it with someone else. The CDC says that raises your risk of getting an infection.

  • Question 1/14

    Which of the following items can transfer potentially dangerous microbes between people?

  • Answer 1/14

    Which of the following items can transfer potentially dangerous microbes between people?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Studies show that germs may linger on lipstick, drinking glasses, band instruments, and other personal items.

    Don't share them if you want to avoid picking up potentially harmful bacteria, viruses, or other microbes. 

  • Answer 1/14

    To protect your toothbrush from harmful germs, you should:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The American Dental Association recommends that you rinse your toothbrush with tap water after you use it, then let it air dry. Keeping it in a closed container creates an ideal moist environment for the growth of bacteria.

  • Question 1/14

    To avoid the buildup of bacteria, the American Dental Association recommends replacing your toothbrush every month.

  • Answer 1/14

    To avoid the buildup of bacteria, the American Dental Association recommends replacing your toothbrush every month.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The group suggests you get a new one every 3 to 4 months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed or after you're sick. Your toothbrush won't do a good job cleaning your teeth if it's worn down.

  • Question 1/14

    Antiseptic mouthwashes can keep your gums and teeth healthy.

  • Answer 1/14

    Antiseptic mouthwashes can keep your gums and teeth healthy.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Rinsing with one not only keeps your breath fresh, it can also help reduce plaque, the film of bacteria that forms on your teeth. It lowers inflammation of your gums, too.

    Many dentists recommend using an antiseptic mouthwash twice a day.

  • Question 1/14

    Drinking green tea may help keep your teeth and gums healthy.

  • Answer 1/14

    Drinking green tea may help keep your teeth and gums healthy.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Research shows that it's linked to healthier gums and lower odds for tooth loss.

  • Question 1/14

    All bacteria are bad for the health of your teeth and gums.

  • Answer 1/14

    All bacteria are bad for the health of your teeth and gums.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While some bacteria are bad for your teeth and gums, others play a key role in keeping them healthy. Researchers are exploring a potential new kind of toothpaste based on mouth bacteria that create enzymes that prevent plaque.

  • Question 1/14

    Most bacteria in your mouth live in plaque.

  • Answer 1/14

    Most bacteria in your mouth live in plaque.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most microbes in your mouth are part of a sticky film on your teeth known as plaque, which is the main cause of tooth decay. A single tooth can host 500 million bacteria. This is, of course, why you brush, floss, and use an antiseptic mouth rinse.

  • Answer 1/14

    Bacteria in your mouth can cause tooth decay by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you eat, the outer shell of your teeth, called enamel, can get weakened from acids given off by bacteria on your choppers. Fluoride in toothpaste and mouth rinses can help strengthen your enamel and prevent cavities.

  • Answer 1/14

    Research has shown a link between gum disease and:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Harmful bacteria in your mouth can lead to gum disease, which has been linked to a number of other diseases. It was once believed that the bacteria were the culprit, but researchers have begun to think that inflammation caused by the bacteria is the key factor.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Good job! You know how to deal with those germs in your mouth.

    Results:

    Not bad, but you can do better. Brush up on the germs in your mouth and try the quiz again.

    Results:

    Keep trying. Brush up on the germs in your mouth and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Alfred D. Wyatt Jr., DMD on March 07, 2017 Medically Reviewed on March 07, 2017

Reviewed by Alfred D. Wyatt Jr., DMD on
March 07, 2017

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

Question 1 ) MedicalRF.com

Question 2 ) Frank Gaglione / Digital Vision

Question 3 ) Cultura/Joho / Stockimage

Question 4 ) Tony Latham / Iconica

Question 5 ) iStockphoto

Question 6) Lester Lefkowitz / Photographer’s Choice

Question 7 ) Rohit Mattoo / Flickr

Question 8 ) iStockphoto

Question 9 ) Hemera

Question 10 ) Brand X Pictures

Question 11 ) MedicalRF.com

Question 12 ) iStockphoto

Question 13 ) Jeane ELLROY / Photononstop

Question 14 ) Comstock

Final Slide ) Dylan Ellis / Digital Vision

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Periodontology: “Mouth-Body Connection,” “Go Green for Healthy Teeth and Gums.”

American Academy for the Advancement of Science: “A Bacterium That Acts Like a Toothbrush.”

American Dental Association: “Toothbrush Care, Cleaning and Replacement,” “Bad Breath (Halitosis),” “Cleaning Your Teeth & Gums,” “Statement on Toothbrush Care: Cleaning, Storage and Replacement.”

CDC: “The Use and Handling of Toothbrushes,” "Meningitis Questions & Answers."

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: “Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General.”

Koyama, Y. Preventive Medicine, April 2010.

Society for Science & the Public: “Don’t Share That Clarinet.”

The Nemours Foundation: “The 5-Second Rule.”

Harvard Gazette : “Discovering who lives in your mouth.”

Pennisi, E. Science , March 25, 2005.

Scienceline.org: "Is it really true that a dog’s mouth is cleaner than a human mouth?"

News release, Rowan University.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Meningitis and Encephalitis Fact Sheet."

Byrd, J. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Microbiology , Penguin, 2006.

Solway, A. What's living inside your body? Heinemann Library, 2004.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.