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How are NSAIDs prescribed?

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Doctors prescribe NSAIDs in different doses depending on your condition.

Dosages may range from one to four times per day, depending on how long each drug stays in your body. Your doctor may prescribe higher doses of NSAIDs if you have rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for example, because RA often causes heat, swelling, redness, and stiffness in the joints.

Lower doses may be enough for osteoarthritis and muscle injuries, since there is generally less swelling and often no warmth or redness in the joints.

No single NSAID is guaranteed to work. Your doctor may prescribe several types of NSAIDs before finding one that works best for you.

From: What Are NSAIDs for Arthritis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Arthritis Foundation.

FDA.

RxList.com.

Reviewed by David Zelman on December 22, 2016

SOURCES:

Arthritis Foundation.

FDA.

RxList.com.

Reviewed by David Zelman on December 22, 2016

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