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How can medicine help osteoarthritis (OA)?

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There are a number of medications that are good for arthritis pain. Talk with your doctor before starting any of them. Common over-the-counter medications are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Prescription medications include oxycodone and hydrocodone. Another option is a corticosteroid injection at the site of your joint pain. This is usually given only if the pain is very severe.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Arthritis: Overview."

Arthritis Foundation: "Benefits of Exercise for Osteoarthritis treatment," "Benefits of Weight Loss," "Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine Supplements in Osteoarthritis,"

"Osteoarthritis Treatment," "Supplement and Herb Guide," "The Ultimate Arthritis Diet," "Understanding Your Joint Procedure Options."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Arthritis: Overview."

Arthritis Foundation: "Benefits of Exercise for Osteoarthritis treatment," "Benefits of Weight Loss," "Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine Supplements in Osteoarthritis,"

"Osteoarthritis Treatment," "Supplement and Herb Guide," "The Ultimate Arthritis Diet," "Understanding Your Joint Procedure Options."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2017

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How can natural remedies help osteoarthritis (OA)?

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