PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can natural remedies help osteoarthritis (OA)?

ANSWER

Some herbs and supplements (capsaicin, flaxseed, ginger, ginkgo, and turmeric) are said to be good for arthritis. But the most popular ones for pain relief are chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine. Both are made of compounds found in cartilage. They may help your body regenerate the cartilage on your joints, but evidence is sketchy.

Studies have shown they may provide modest pain relief and could be tried if you're unable to tolerate other pain medications. The American College of Rheumatology doesn’t currently recommend the use of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine.

Other natural remedies include acupuncture, massage, heating pads, and ice packs. Reducing stress by maintaining a positive outlook may also help.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Arthritis: Overview."

Arthritis Foundation: "Benefits of Exercise for Osteoarthritis treatment," "Benefits of Weight Loss," "Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine Supplements in Osteoarthritis,"

"Osteoarthritis Treatment," "Supplement and Herb Guide," "The Ultimate Arthritis Diet," "Understanding Your Joint Procedure Options."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Arthritis: Overview."

Arthritis Foundation: "Benefits of Exercise for Osteoarthritis treatment," "Benefits of Weight Loss," "Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine Supplements in Osteoarthritis,"

"Osteoarthritis Treatment," "Supplement and Herb Guide," "The Ultimate Arthritis Diet," "Understanding Your Joint Procedure Options."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

How can physical therapy help osteoarthritis (OA)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.