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I live alone, and I’m recovering from hip replacement surgery. How can family and friends help?

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As you recover from hip replacement surgery, if you live alone, family and friends could help set up a "base camp" where you'll spend most of your time -- with phone, computer, remotes, and everything else you'll need in easy reach.

They could also remove tripping hazards like loose rugs, help pick out helpful gadgets like reachers, and set up stairway and bathroom railings.

If you don't have a support system you can rely on, ask your doctor if you could stay in a rehab center after surgery.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Preparing for Joint Replacement Surgery," "Activities After a Knee Replacement," "Is Hip Replacement Surgery for You?"

Matthew Austin, MD, spokesman, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; orthopedic surgeon, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia.

Tariq Nayfeh, MD, PhD, assistant professor, orthopaedic surgery, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 13, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Preparing for Joint Replacement Surgery," "Activities After a Knee Replacement," "Is Hip Replacement Surgery for You?"

Matthew Austin, MD, spokesman, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; orthopedic surgeon, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia.

Tariq Nayfeh, MD, PhD, assistant professor, orthopaedic surgery, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 13, 2018

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