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What are other treatments for osteoarthritis?

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Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also available over the counter in certain strengths. Examples include aspirin, naproxen sodium (Aleve), and ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil). Topical ointments and creams are also available to treat pain. They are applied to the skin in the area that hurts, but generally, these are not effective. Examples of topical drugs include Ben-Gay and Aspercreme. Your doctor may also recommend prescription drugs to treat symptoms, as there are no medications that reverse the process. These may include prescription painkillers, mild narcotics, or injections of corticosteroids around the spinal column called epidural steroid injections. It is important to understand that these injections do not correct the underlying problem and are sometimes used without clear indication of long-term benefit.

SOURCE:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “Spinal Stenosis” and "Osteoarthritis."

 

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 10, 2019

SOURCE:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “Spinal Stenosis” and "Osteoarthritis."

 

 

Reviewed by David Zelman on September 10, 2019

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When is surgery used to treat osteoarthritis?

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