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What is arthritis?

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Arthritis is a general term for inflammation in the joints. Arthritis can occur in numerous forms. The most common is osteoarthritis, a condition in which the cartilage, the protective cushioning between the joints, wears out. When this happens, the bones rub directly against other bones. This causes structural changes that can be seen on X-rays. Bone deposits or bone spurs known as osteophytes may develop on the edges of the joints. The soft tissues that stabilize joints may also show signs of wear. Arthritis is often painful, but not always. Over time, arthritis can result in joint deformity and can limit the motion and function of joints.

From: What Is Hand Osteoarthritis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Society for Surgery of the Hand: "Osteoarthritis."

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons' OrthoInfo: "Arthritis of the Hand."

Arthritis Foundation: "Osteoarthritis of the Hands," "Topical NSAIDs Offer Rub-on Relief."

Cleveland Clinic: "Arthritis of the Wrist and Hand."

UpToDate: "Management of Hand Osteoarthritis."

Reviewed by David Zelman on March 08, 2018

SOURCES:

American Society for Surgery of the Hand: "Osteoarthritis."

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons' OrthoInfo: "Arthritis of the Hand."

Arthritis Foundation: "Osteoarthritis of the Hands," "Topical NSAIDs Offer Rub-on Relief."

Cleveland Clinic: "Arthritis of the Wrist and Hand."

UpToDate: "Management of Hand Osteoarthritis."

Reviewed by David Zelman on March 08, 2018

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Who gets osteoarthritis?

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