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What is knee replacement surgery?

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You can’t move like you used to. It’s painful to walk the dog, climb a flight of stairs, or simply get out of a chair. You’ve tried medicines, injections, and physical therapy. Nothing seems to work. If that’s the case, it could be time to consider knee replacement surgery.

Also known as arthroplasty, knee replacement surgery is one of the most common bone surgeries in the United States. It can help ease the pain caused by severe arthritis. It also may help you move more freely. U.S. doctors perform more than 600,000 knee replacement surgeries each year.

During surgery, an orthopedic surgeon carves away the damaged part of the knee and replaces it with an artificial joint made of metal or plastic. The artificial joint is then attached to the thigh bone, shin, and kneecap with a special material such as acrylic cement.

From: What’s Knee Replacement Surgery? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: “Total Knee Replacement.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Osteoarthritis.”

National Institutes of Heath: “Knee Replacement.”

Arthritis Research: “What are the different types of knee replacement surgery?"

Mayo Clinic: “Knee Replacement.”

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: “Knee Replacement Implants.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Total Knee Replacement.”

Reviewed by James Kercher on April 22, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: “Total Knee Replacement.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Osteoarthritis.”

National Institutes of Heath: “Knee Replacement.”

Arthritis Research: “What are the different types of knee replacement surgery?"

Mayo Clinic: “Knee Replacement.”

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: “Knee Replacement Implants.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Total Knee Replacement.”

Reviewed by James Kercher on April 22, 2019

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Why would I need knee replacement surgery?

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