PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What medications treat osteoarthritis?

ANSWER

The first step is often over-the-counter pain relievers as needed. If they aren't effective, your doctor may prescribe a stronger anti-inflammatory drug or other medication to help ease the pain.

Some creams, rubs, and sprays can be applied to the skin over affected areas to relieve pain. Steroids can be injected directly into the joint several times a year, but that may speed joint damage. Injections of hyaluronic acid into the knee joint can relieve pain for some people.

But none of these will reverse or slow the joint damage.

From: The Basics of Osteoarthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

CDC. 

Arthritis Foundation. 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 5, 2018

SOURCES: 

CDC. 

Arthritis Foundation. 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. 

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 5, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Can supplements help osteoarthritis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.