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How can vitamin D help rebuild your bone after a fracture?

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Vitamin D helps your blood take in and use calcium and build up the minerals in your bones. You get some vitamin D from sunlight, so spending time outside can help (15 minutes is enough if you’re fair skinned).

Only a few foods, including egg yolks and fatty fish, naturally have this vitamin. But it’s also added to lots of other products, like milk or orange juice. Adults should get at least 600 IU of vitamin D every day, and if you're over 70 you should get at least 800 IU.

Good sources: Swordfish, salmon, cod liver oil, sardines, liver, and vitamin D fortified foods.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Nonunions."

American Society of Orthopedic Professionals: "Essential Nutrients to Aid Fracture Repair."

Dairy Council of California: "Eating to Heal a Broken Bone."

New York State Osteoporosis Prevention Program: "Spine Fractures."

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin D."

National Osteoporosis Society UK: "Minerals and bone health."

Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism , May 2017.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on May 23, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Nonunions."

American Society of Orthopedic Professionals: "Essential Nutrients to Aid Fracture Repair."

Dairy Council of California: "Eating to Heal a Broken Bone."

New York State Osteoporosis Prevention Program: "Spine Fractures."

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin D."

National Osteoporosis Society UK: "Minerals and bone health."

Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism , May 2017.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on May 23, 2018

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How can vitamin C help rebuild your bone after a fracture?

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