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How does Vitamin D help with treating osteoporosis?

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Your body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium and move it into and out of bones. Fatty fish like salmon and tuna are good sources. But not many other foods are rich in vitamin D, so you may need to take a supplement to get enough. Because calcium supplements can keep the body from absorbing certain drugs, check with your doctor before you start taking them if you are on any medications.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases:"The NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases -- National Resource Center."

National Osteoporosis Association: "Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief." 

Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia: "Osteoporosis."

MayoClinic.com: "Bone density test: Measure your risk of osteoporosis."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Screening for Osteoporosis."

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Facts on Osteoporosis."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases:"The NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases -- National Resource Center."

National Osteoporosis Association: "Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief." 

Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia: "Osteoporosis."

MayoClinic.com: "Bone density test: Measure your risk of osteoporosis."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Screening for Osteoporosis."

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Facts on Osteoporosis."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by David Zelman on May 28, 2019

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