PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are some good habits I can practice to prevent falls?

ANSWER

To prevent falls, you can:

  • Be active. Exercise makes your muscles stronger.
  • Be mindful of your medications. Some can make you dizzy or drowsy.
  • Get your eyes checked every year. Bad vision makes it hard to get around safely.
  • Get enough calcium and vitamin D. These slow bone loss, making fractures less likely.
  • Don’t rush. Hurrying to do things like answer the phone or use the bathroom makes it more likely you’ll fall.
  • Go easy on alcohol. It can slow your reflexes and throw off your balance.

From: How to Prevent Falls at Home WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cameron, I., , February 2002. BMJ

Harvard Medical School: "Osteopenia: When you have weak bones, but not osteoporosis."

CDC: "Preventing Falls Among Older Adults," "What You Can Do to Prevent Falls."

Jane W. McCabe, occupational therapist and certified aging-in-place specialist, Orange County, CA.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?"

National Institute on Aging: "Osteoporosis: Improving Your Bone Health."

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 13, 2018

SOURCES:

Cameron, I., , February 2002. BMJ

Harvard Medical School: "Osteopenia: When you have weak bones, but not osteoporosis."

CDC: "Preventing Falls Among Older Adults," "What You Can Do to Prevent Falls."

Jane W. McCabe, occupational therapist and certified aging-in-place specialist, Orange County, CA.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?"

National Institute on Aging: "Osteoporosis: Improving Your Bone Health."

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 13, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How does exercise help osteoporosis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.