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What are the most common fractures for people who have osteoporosis?

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The most common fractures for people who have osteoporosis are in the spine, hip, wrist, and forearm. They each have their own long-term effects, but they do have some things in common.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Osteoporosis."

International Osteoporosis Foundation: "Impact of Osteoporosis."

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Osteoporotic fractures in older adults."

Osteoporosis Canada: "Osteoporosis Facts & Statistics."

OrthoInfo: "Osteoporosis and Spinal Fractures."

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: "Arthritis and Osteoporosis in Australia 2008."

NIH, National Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center: "Once Is Enough: A Guide to Preventing Future Fractures."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Vertical Compression Fractures."

MyHIVClinic.org: "Osteoporosis."

University of Rochester: "Hip Fracture."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on May 23, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Osteoporosis."

International Osteoporosis Foundation: "Impact of Osteoporosis."

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Osteoporotic fractures in older adults."

Osteoporosis Canada: "Osteoporosis Facts & Statistics."

OrthoInfo: "Osteoporosis and Spinal Fractures."

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare: "Arthritis and Osteoporosis in Australia 2008."

NIH, National Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center: "Once Is Enough: A Guide to Preventing Future Fractures."

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: "Vertical Compression Fractures."

MyHIVClinic.org: "Osteoporosis."

University of Rochester: "Hip Fracture."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on May 23, 2018

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How painful are bone fractures?

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