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What are the types of surgeries for compression fractures?

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If medication, physical therapy, rest, or other techniques don’t work for your pain, your doctor may recommend surgery.

There are two types of surgery for treating compression fractures: vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. With vertebroplasty, your doctor uses a needle to inject a bone cement mixture into the fracture to help it heal. With kyphoplasty, your doctor inflates a small balloon in the fracture to create a hollow space. Then the doctor fills it with the bone cement mixture. These procedures seem to work best if you have them within 8 weeks of getting the spinal fracture.

From: Osteoporosis Pain: What You Can Do WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Osteoporosis Fast Facts." 

WebMD Medical Reference: "Your Guide to Spinal Compression Fractures." 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Osteoporosis: Coping with Chronic Pain." 

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Medications to Prevent and Treat Osteoporosis."

RadiologyInfo.org: "Vertebroplasty & Kyphoplasty."

 

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 18, 2016

SOURCES: 

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Osteoporosis Fast Facts." 

WebMD Medical Reference: "Your Guide to Spinal Compression Fractures." 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Osteoporosis: Coping with Chronic Pain." 

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Medications to Prevent and Treat Osteoporosis."

RadiologyInfo.org: "Vertebroplasty & Kyphoplasty."

 

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 18, 2016

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